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This discussion has a series of "large questions for the training industry."

 

-What is the career path for the CLO?

-Do you think the training industry has a "blind spot?

-2009 Social Media Trends - what is your opinion on what this means to our industry?

-What innovation do you expect will gain widespread acceptance by the workplace learning community in the next 10 years?

-What is the impact of time, money, access and credibility to your learning preferences? (elaboration immediatey below)

 

If time, money, access and credibility were not in question - which of these methods would be your preferred method of learning:

Classroom
Online via an LMS (Learning Management System)
Online via other means (e.g. Google, LinkedIn, Wikipedia, You-Tube, Social Communities, etc.)
Conversation with a friend

Since time. money, access and credibility are in question which of these methods is most likely to be the one you use most often in the future when you need to learn something?

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What innovation do you expect will gain widespread acceptance by the workplace learning community in the next 10 years?

1970's (Self-paced instruction)
1980's (Video - CD's, video disc, satellite, video conference)
1990's (Computer based instruction, CBT's)
2000's (Online Collaboration, e.g. Placeware, Webex, Centra etc.)
2010's ?????
2009 Social Media Trends - what is your opinion on what this means to our industry?

http://mediatransparent.com/2009/01/01/10-leading-trends-in-social-...
Here is my opinion:

1) 2008 and 2009 Crushed the Old Training Models e.g (ILT and eLearning), 2010 will see New Training Models
2) Public Training Crashes in 2009; Learners Will Demand Online Presence
3) In Particular, Learners Will Demand Corporate Social Media Presence
4) The 2009 Recession will Elevate Social Learning as a Corporate Cost Control Measure
5) Learners will be demotivated by Stale Content (staleness will accelerate)
6) The Focus of Learning Will be Distribution over Creation
7) Discovery is the Killer App
8 ) The Question: “How does Social Media Help Me Learn?” seems like a "dumb" question
9) Social Capital is the New SEO
10) The Ascendancy of the Social Media while Blogging Takes a Back Seat
11) The Social Media and Cloud Collaboration Team Up to Create "Anyone can be a trainer" environment
Do you think our industry has a "blind spot?"

Most of us have an opinion about what the automotive, newspaper and mortgage industries seemed unable or unwilling to fix. What about our industry? Are we doing everything right? Is there a common area that people outside our industry can see that we are unable or unwilling to fix from within?
Certainly the industry will change. Many companies will no longer be in business. We need to be different in the future. No sure how yet.
Paul - very good timing on this. I've got quite a few thoughts about the need to change:

Business of Learning

but not sure what people will buy right now or in the near term.
Paul Terlemezian said:
Do you think our industry has a "blind spot?"

Most of us have an opinion about what the automotive, newspaper and mortgage industries seemed unable or unwilling to fix. What about our industry? Are we doing everything right? Is there a common area that people outside our industry can see that we are unable or unwilling to fix from within?
Paul,

I think the biggest blind spot in our industry is our unwillingness or inability to differeniate training and education. So much of what we provide is more information about the subject rather than the ability to do something with the information we already have. So does more information about the physics involved when a golf club strikes a golf ball make anyone a better golfer.

Secondly we are likely to provide what the customers ask for ("I want advanced sales training') as opposed to discovering what the customer really needs ( We are struggling with the difficult price objection.)

Finally our inability or unwillingness to measure ROI makes us an expense rather than a business partner. In difficult times expenses are the first cuts so at a time when enhanced skills could be the road out of recovery, most organizations cut training because it is a nice to have not a need to have.

Patrick Malone said:
Paul Terlemezian said:
Do you think our industry has a "blind spot?"

Most of us have an opinion about what the automotive, newspaper and mortgage industries seemed unable or unwilling to fix. What about our industry? Are we doing everything right? Is there a common area that people outside our industry can see that we are unable or unwilling to fix from within?
Zach, when will it be urgent to determine how?

Zach Doppel said:
Certainly the industry will change. Many companies will no longer be in business. We need to be different in the future. No sure how yet.
Tony, your insights and the dialog are very good. Thanks for sharing the link. I've posted the John Daily video on this site - with a warnning about the "vulgarisms" - the message is relevant to this community.

Tony Karrer said:
Paul - very good timing on this. I've got quite a few thoughts about the need to change:

Business of Learning

but not sure what people will buy right now or in the near term.
Pat,

1. Training "vs." education
2. Provide what is asked for "vs." determine what is needed
3. Inability/unwillingness to measure ROI

Will it ever change? Will this be the epitaph for our industry? What will be needed to make it change?

Patrick Malone said:
Paul,

I think the biggest blind spot in our industry is our unwillingness or inability to differeniate training and education. So much of what we provide is more information about the subject rather than the ability to do something with the information we already have. So does more information about the physics involved when a golf club strikes a golf ball make anyone a better golfer.

Secondly we are likely to provide what the customers ask for ("I want advanced sales training') as opposed to discovering what the customer really needs ( We are struggling with the difficult price objection.)

Finally our inability or unwillingness to measure ROI makes us an expense rather than a business partner. In difficult times expenses are the first cuts so at a time when enhanced skills could be the road out of recovery, most organizations cut training because it is a nice to have not a need to have.

Patrick Malone said:
Paul Terlemezian said:
Do you think our industry has a "blind spot?"

Most of us have an opinion about what the automotive, newspaper and mortgage industries seemed unable or unwilling to fix. What about our industry? Are we doing everything right? Is there a common area that people outside our industry can see that we are unable or unwilling to fix from within?
Paul,

Insanity is doing the same things over and over and expecting different results

Paul Terlemezian said:
Pat,

1. Training "vs." education
2. Provide what is asked for "vs." determine what is needed
3. Inability/unwillingness to measure ROI

Will it ever change? Will this be the epitaph for our industry? What will be needed to make it change?

Patrick Malone said:
Paul,

I think the biggest blind spot in our industry is our unwillingness or inability to differeniate training and education. So much of what we provide is more information about the subject rather than the ability to do something with the information we already have. So does more information about the physics involved when a golf club strikes a golf ball make anyone a better golfer.

Secondly we are likely to provide what the customers ask for ("I want advanced sales training') as opposed to discovering what the customer really needs ( We are struggling with the difficult price objection.)

Finally our inability or unwillingness to measure ROI makes us an expense rather than a business partner. In difficult times expenses are the first cuts so at a time when enhanced skills could be the road out of recovery, most organizations cut training because it is a nice to have not a need to have.

Patrick Malone said:
Paul Terlemezian said:
Do you think our industry has a "blind spot?"

Most of us have an opinion about what the automotive, newspaper and mortgage industries seemed unable or unwilling to fix. What about our industry? Are we doing everything right? Is there a common area that people outside our industry can see that we are unable or unwilling to fix from within?
I think most people prefer in the classroom learning. It has higher bandwidth, networking and personal attention and interaction that does not happen as well online. That said this can be 2 to 5 times more expensive and so for practical purposes there needs to be a mix of training. I believe the more advanced and complex the training the more you need classroom format. Simple courses are fine through online, DVD and other modalities.

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